Master Your Household Recyling in 5 Easy Steps

All homeowners are being encouraged to recycle what they no longer need or use as opposed to throwing it away to be put in a landfill site which, as we now know, is particularly damaging to the environment. Rather than just putting things in a bin and that being the end of it, we’re asked to put the items into specified bins which are taken away by the council on a weekly or fortnightly basis.

 

The issue that many have is over which bin to put certain items in, especially in the UK where there are two, three or even four bins in some areas of the country, each with their own purpose. Homeowners have enough to think about on a daily basis with their work and family lives taking precedence without having to worry about whether they’ve put the item in the correct bin, but many still try their hardest to ensure that they do their bit to go green.

 

While it can seem complicated on the surface with the different coloured bins out in the garden, it can be made simpler and here are a few examples of what you can do to go green without tearing your hair out in the process:

 

Firstly, you don’t have to throw everything away. Choosing the right bin is difficult, especially if it’s a combination of two materials and you don’t know which category it falls under. In other cases it can be difficult to accept actually throwing something in a bin especially when you’ve paid so much money for it in the first place, like with a mobile phone or camera. If you don’t like putting items such as these in a bin then you can sell your mobile or camera online at onrecycle.co.uk who will actually pay you to recycle the device for you – a genuine win-win for everyone. All you do is fill in a few details, post it off to them and you’ll get the money.

 

If you are set on recycling your waste or unwanted items, however, one thing you could do is to make space for a recycling bin in each room of the house so that they can be collated on the collection day. While many homes have a recycling bin in the kitchen, bedrooms and bathrooms usually just have the one bin which means your recycling plans are thrown into chaos. By providing a recycling bin, however, you can encourage the family to recycle everything that leaves the house fro toilet roll tubes to unwanted or broken toys and DVDs.

 

Attending local car boot sales and donating to charity shops is a good way of giving your items away and making some easy money or doing your bit for charity. You’re not only clearing out your house but you’re giving the items to someone who can genuinely use the things you have no use for – a far better option than sending them to landfill or just getting them recycled.

 

Creating a checklist for each bin can be helpful, especially for those struggling to get to grips with which bin to put things in. For example, if plastics are confusing you in terms of whether you put them in the normal recycling bin or mixed recycling, ask yourself ( 1 ) is it plastic? and ( 2 ) is it in the typical shape of a bottle? If the answer to both is yes, put it in the mixed recycling bin.

 

Finally, if in doubt, leave it out. It is better to put things in the main bin than it is to fill your recycling bin with the wrong materials. For example, one bin might ask for glass jars and bottles but it may not accept plastic bottles. Rather than throwing the plastic one in too, thinking “it’s a bottle, why not”, either place it in a different bin or ask for advice – don’t just throw it in as this can make it difficult to recycle the right items in the right place.

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